2 Photography Exhibits Coming to the Elliott

Works by award-winning National Geographic photographers Carlton Ward Jr.’s and Mac Stone’s arrive at the Elliott Museum August 3

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National Geographic photographer Carlton Ward Jr. Photo courtesy of Carlton Ward Jr.
National Geographic photographer Carlton Ward Jr. Photo courtesy of Carlton Ward Jr.

The Historical Society of Martin County will continue its “Protect Our Peninsula” series, the annual presentation of major exhibits addressing the fragility of Florida’s natural environment, with the unveiling of Carlton Ward Jr.’s “Path of the Panther” and Mac Stone’s “Wild Everglades,” showcases of works by two award-winning National Geographic photographers.

To open the exhibits, the Elliott Museum will set the scene for a public reception on August 3, from 5-7:30 p.m. The reception is free to members and regular admission for non-members. Call 772-225-1961 to RSVP.
In the coming months, the Elliott will host a series of lectures, forums, and other engagements to raise awareness and influence behaviors in the realm of pure conservation.
“This will be a meaningful show to help enlighten and stir to action all Florida residents and guests,” said Historical Society of Martin County President and CEO Rob Steele. “We are resolute in our desire to use the Elliott Museum as a platform and a forum to bring about change in this most crucial battle.”
National Geographic photographer Mac Stone. Photo courtesy of Mac Stone
National Geographic photographer Mac Stone. Photo courtesy of Mac Stone
Carlton Ward is a National Geographic explorer and photographer who has spent almost two decades advocating for the Florida Wildlife Corridor, a network of public and private lands that provide a lifeline for the critically endangered Florida panther. In 2015, he launched the “Path of the Panther” project with the National Geographic Society and moved his Airstream trailer to the Everglades. He and his team spent six years working with camera traps to capture photographs for this exhibit, which also are featured in the April 2021 issue of National Geographic Magazine and the new National Geographic book, Path of the Panther.
Mac Stone is also is a National Geographic explorer and photographer who grew up exploring North Central Florida’s springs, swamps, and hammocks. While most people view swamps and wetlands as obstacles to avoid, Stone sees these places as national treasures. He documents the wildlife stories of Florida’s Everglades, and through his stunning photographs, Stone shines a new light on a neglected, ancient, and important wilderness. He encourages others to explore the swamps for themselves to change public opinion for the better. His TED talk on the Everglades has been viewed more than one million times. Presently, Stone is working with National Geographic exploring the United States’ remaining old growth swamps to understand how the southeast used to look and function.
Learn more about the exhibits here.

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